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Advances in Animal and Veterinary Sciences

Case Report
Adv. Anim. Vet. Sci. 2 (1): 46 - 49
http://dx.doi.org/10.14737/journal.aavs/2014.2.1.46.49
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Arslan Tariq1*, Asim Shahzad2, Razia kuasar3, Asher Mehfooz4,Asad Manzoor4, Misbah Ijaz4, Imaad Rashid4, Nasir Mahmood1, Jahanzeb Tahir1, Syed Hamza Turab Zaidi1, Uzair Ahasan Fiaz1, Muhammad Salman Qureshi5
1Faculty of Veterinary Sciences (FVS), University of Agriculture Faisalabad (UAF), Pakistan; 2Department of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences (FVS), University of Agriculture Faisalabad (UAF), Pakistan; 3Department of Veterinary Anatomy and Histology, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences (FVS), University of Agriculture Faisalabad (UAF), Pakistan; 4Department of Clinics, Medicine and Surgery (CMS), Faculty of Veterinary Sciences (FVS), University of Agriculture Faisalabad (UAF), Pakistan; 5Faculty of Veterinary Sciences (FVS), Gomal University Dara Ismail Khan, Pakistan
*Corresponding author: dr.arslantariq3418@live.com

ABSTRACT
Inflammation, bluish discoloration of udder and teat skin; and increase in somatic cell count (SCC) are the main identification marks for gangrenous mastitis. Staphylococcus aureus is well known to produce gangrenous mastitis in milking animal’s especially small ruminants of 2–3 year of age. A typical case of gangrenous mastitis with characteristic signs and symptoms was recorded at department of Clinical, Medicine and Surgery (CMS), University of Agriculture, Faisalabad (UAF), Pakistan. Right teat of animal was almost necrosed which became sloughed–off on palpation leaving an open infected wound. Somatic cell count (SCC)>1x106, pus in milk from left teat and round cream colonies of S. aureus on Staphylococcus 110 medium in bacterial culture provide base for tentative diagnosis as gangrenous mastitis. But confirmation occur after getting catalase positive (+) and coagulase positive (+ve) tests at 4 hours. Wound dressing with antiseptic, cover antibiotic and anti–inflammatory was recommended for 7 days along with pre and post teat dipping. Animal was on the way of recovery when checked after 12 days of treatment but animal lost one teat permanently.

Key words: Staphylococcus aureus, Necrosis, Gangrenous mastitis, Cream color colonies, Somatic cell count (SCC), Enrofloxacin, Leno-dip, Vaccination