Advances in Animal and Veterinary Sciences

Research Article
Adv. Anim. Vet. Sci. 9(1): 132-136
Http://dx.doi.org/10.17582/journal.aavs/2021/9.1.132.136
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Mohamed Fathy1, Khaled A. Abdel-Moein3, Wafaa A. Osman1, Ahmed M. Erfan4, Abdelbary Prince5, Amani A. Hafez1, Hossam Eldin Mahmoud2, Tarek E. Mosallam6, Ahmed Samir2*

1Department of Animal and Poultry Health, Desert Research Centre, Matariya, Cairo, 11753, Egypt; 2Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, 12211, Egypt; 3Derrtment of Zoonoses, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, 12211, Egypt; 4National Laboratory for Veterinary Quality Control on Poultry Production, Animal Health Research Institute, Dokki, Giza, 12618, Egypt; 5Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, 12211, Egypt; 6Department of Udder Health and Neonates disease, Animal Reproduction Research Institute, Haram, Giza, 12556, Egypt.

Abstract | Clostridium difficile is a well-known enteric pathogen causing antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis among humans. Lately, C. difficile has emerged to cause enteric problems in food producing animals, horses and household pets particularly young ones. This study was conducted to investigate the performance of different laboratory diagnostic methods for Clostridium difficile in veterinary field. For this purpose, ninety fecal samples collected from diarrheic sheep, goats and chickens, were examined for the detection of C. difficile using three laboratory methods: direct Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on DNA extracted from fecal samples, conventional culture followed by molecular confirmation of isolates and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) ELISA on feces. The detection rates of C. difficile were 45.6%, 16.7% and 8.9% by direct PCR, conventional culture followed by molecular confirmation of isolates and GDH-ELISA, respectively. Direct PCR yielded the highest detection rate, however, false negative results were recorded in 3 samples being positive by culture method, whereas, all GDH-ELISA positive samples were also positive by the other techniques. In conclusion, Direct PCR on DNA extracted from fecal samples of animals showed the highest detection rate nevertheless false negative results cannot be ruled out.

Keywords | Clostridium difficile, Laboratory diagnosis, Animals