Advances in Animal and Veterinary Sciences

Research Article
Adv. Anim. Vet. Sci. 9(11): 1816-1828
Http://dx.doi.org/10.17582/journal.aavs/2021/9.11.1816.1828
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Saleh M Albarrak

Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Qassim University, Buraydah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract | The effects of Lycium shawii and Rhanterium epapposum supplementation on humoral and cellular immune responses of chickens have not been investigated. Chickens supplemented with either R. epapposum or Lycium shawii extracts and challenged with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) exhibited a significant increase in body weight gain as compared to the control group (P<0.05). The data showed a significant increase in the serum activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the chickens pretreated with the R. epapposum extract (P<0.05). In contrast, only the activities of the SOD and TAC enzymes were significantly elevated in the Lycium shawii recipient group (P<0.05). Significant increases (P<0.05) in the in-vitro phagocytic index of chickens supplemented with either extract was noted, with the phagocytic index remaining significantly elevated (P< 0.01) throughout the experiment only in the R. epapposum group. In response to mitogenic stimulation, lymphocytes obtained from the R. epapposum and Lycium shawii groups consumed significantly higher amounts of glucose relative to the control group (P< 0.01 and P< 0.05, respectively). Chickens pretreated with Lycium shawii had significantly higher levels of serum IgM (P<0.05), with the IgG levels being significantly higher in the chickens pretreated with either extract, as well as in the SRBC group (P<0.01). The IgG levels remained significantly elevated (P<0.01) in the Lycium shawii recipient chickens until the experiment’s termination. It can be concluded that the plant extracts used in the present study had stimulatory effects on the chicken’s immune systems and broilers’ performance in general.

Keywords | Lycium shawii, Rhanterium epapposum, Immune responses, Ross chicken, Antioxidants