Advances in Animal and Veterinary Sciences

Short Communication
Adv. Anim. Vet. Sci. 8(10): 1063-1067
Http://dx.doi.org/10.17582/journal.aavs/2020/8.10.1063.1067
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Raslan Ain-Fatin1, Saulol Hamid Nur-Fazila1*, Md Isa Nur-Mahiza1, Abd Rahaman Yasmin2, Yong Meng Goh3

1Department of Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 2Department of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnostics, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 3Department of Veterinary Preclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.

Abstract | Parasitic infection in the laboratory mice (Mus musculus) may affect certain research outcomes especially during high worm burden. This study allows the assessment of parasite infection of mice based on stocking density that potentially serve as a guideline for proper management to be implemented. Fifty-four (54) male BALB/c mice were randomly chosen from an animal facility located in Klang Valley, Malaysia and placed for three replicates in groups of 3, 6 and 9 mice per cage to reflect different stocking densities. Endoparasites were examined by direct faecal smear, perianal tape test, faecal floatation and gastrointestinal examination techniques. Ectoparasites were identified under fur pluck method, tape impression test and carcass immersion while blood smear techniques were performed for blood parasites detection. Samples were taken weekly for a total of 5 weeks. Results revealed infection with pinworms; Syphacia obvelata and Aspiculuris tetraptera. Statistical analysis revealed no association between parasites and various stocking density using repeated-measures ANOVA. However, gastrointestinal examination mentioned as the ‘gold standard’ revealed an association using one-way ANOVA when P < 0.05. Overall, the results varied according to the parasitological methods used and stocking densities do not play a role in the parasitic levels of laboratory mice.

Keywords | Aspiculuris tetraptera, Laboratory mice, Pinworms, Stocking density, Syphacia oblevata