Phone : 0092 300 7786573

Journal of Infection and Molecular Biology

Short Communication
J. Inf. Mol. Biol. 2 (3): 43 - 48
Http://dx.doi.org/10.14737/jimb.2307-5465/2.3.43.48
View Full HTML
Download PDF

Kamrul Islam1*, Abdul Ahad1, Altaf Mahmood2, Md. Mizanur Rahman3, Md. Zohorul Islam1, Md. Hazzaz Bin Kabir6, Mukti Barua4, Sharmin Chowdhury5, Muhammad Kamal Nasir2, Paritosh Kumar Biswas1
1Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chittagong, Bangladesh; 2Livestock and Dairy Development Department, Government of Punjab, Pakistan; 3Department of Medicine and Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chittagong, Bangladesh; 4Department of Animal Science and Animal Nutrition, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chittagong, Bangladesh; 5Department of Pathology and parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chittagong, Bangladesh; 6Department of Microbiology & Parasitology, Faculty of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Sher–e–Bangla Agricultural University, Dhaka.
*Corresponding author: kamruldvm13@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
Peste des petits ruminant (PPR) is an acute febrile viral disease of small ruminants characterized by mucopurulent nasal and ocular discharges, necrotizing and erosive stomatitis, enteritis and pneumonia. Present study was carried out on one hundred and eighty two goats during July to December, 2012. Black Bengal goats depicted higher prevalence (P = 0.66) than Crossbred and Jamunapari goats. Clinical examination revealed significantly increased heart (P = 0.00), temperature (P = 0.00) and respiratory rates (P = 0.00) in PPR affected goats (n = 87) than healthy goats (P < 0.05). Significantly higher prevalence (P < 0.00) of PPR (65%) was recorded in non vaccinated group (n = 102, P < 0.05) whereas non-significant difference in PPR was recorded with respect to breed (P = 0.66), sex (P = 0.68) and month (P = 0.50) of disease occurrence (P > 0.05). Blood samples of PPR affected goats (n = 10) exhibited significantly decreased (P = 0.02) total leukocyte count (9.31±0.53 thousand/mm3) and (P = 0.01) lymphocytes (41.20±2.26%) (P < 0.05), whereas significantly increased (P = 0.02) neutrophils (41.30±2.32%) as compared to healthy goats (n = 10) (P < 0.05). Postmortem examination of PPR suspected goats revealed characteristics zebra stripe lesions at ileo–caecal junction. The study suggests that PPR can affect goat population irrespective of age, breed and sex. Supportive therapy with Oxytetracycline can enhance recovery of the PPR affected goats and vaccination can reduce the disease prevalence leading to effective control and prevention.

Key Words: PPR, Clinico–pathological features, Prevalence, Post–mortem, Breeds of goats